All posts by simon oldridge

Possibility of community monitoring of traffic speeds – email from police

Please see bold section below.  Seems there’s a possibility of communities being trained to use speed guns.  If you’re interested, please contact the clerk, Karen Smith.   This hasn’t been discussed at parish council yet.  Depending on interest, I will propose at the next council meeting that we should look into this initiative.

Simon Oldridge 18 Jul 2018

 

From: Darryl White <Darryl.White@swdevon.gov.uk>
Date: Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 10:16 AM
Subject: Devon & Cornwall Police: Annual Community Scrutiny Forum
To: SH-All Parish Clerks <SH-AllParishClerks@southhams.gov.uk>
Cc: Louisa Daley <Louisa.Daley@swdevon.gov.uk>, “Cllr P. Smerdon” <Cllr.Smerdon@southhams.gov.uk>

Dear Clerks,

 

Please see summary report (as below) from Cllr Peter Smerdon following the recent Devon and Cornwall Police Annual Community Safety Forum.

With best wishes,
Darryl

 

 

On Friday 6 July, Devon and Cornwall Police held a Connectivity discussion at Newton Abbot Police Station as part of their Annual Community Scrutiny Forum.

 

The intention was to allow the police to explain their management and command structure across South Devon, to review their current communication methods and to explore ways of improving and modernising communications, with the public and stakeholders such as Councillors, Clerks and other community members.

 

In charge of the day was Chief Inspector Julian Pezzani, second in command of the whole South Devon policing area, which includes Torbay but not Plymouth.

 

The Sergeant in charge of each area within South Devon Force Area gave a presentation which detailed the number of Officers and PCSOs they have at their disposal.  The areas we learnt about were:- Kingsbridge, Totnes, Dartmouth, Ivybridge, Newton Abbot, Teignbridge Rural, Paignton and Torquay. The Sergeants also explained how their officers engage with the public in their area and how they get out their important  community information. In return they asked for feedback as to how this could be improved.

 

Here is a summary of what was said:-

 

Communications with Towns and Parishes varied, Officers will try to attend all the main towns and some larger villages, some every meeting, some possibly quarterly.

 

Some rural Parishes will get an email update every month or so, but not all areas. The advice to Clerks was to look at each “Area” section of the Devon and Cornwall Police website to check for crime information prior to a monthly meeting. You can also find details of your Neighbourhood Police Team there. Regular email updates come through alert@neighbourhoodalert.co.uk which Members can sign up to and which are very helpful.

 

Increasing emphasis is being placed on social media. Each of the above 8 areas has its own Facebook page, some have their own Twitter account. The D&C force Twitter account is a very good source of rapid information, from experience it is well worth “following”.

 

Frustrations were expressed about the apparent lack of support given to Neighbourhood Watch, and with the 101 (non emergency) phone no. While promising to do better, it seems that greater priority is being given to online communication.

 

The South Devon area will be upgraded in the autumn to a Basic Command Unit under the command of a Chief Superintendent.

 

Communities concerned about vehicle speeds can apply to be trained to run a Community Speedwatch, using electronic equipment. 

 

Recent emphasis has been given to forming units of Police Cadets, age 14-18. Newton Abbot has a very strong Cadet group of around 50. Many of these young people go on to join the Force or other emergency services

 

If you have suggestions you would like to make or community safety concerns in your parish please liaise with Louisa Daley SHDC Safeguarding and Community Safety Specialist. She is the main contact point for SHDC and D&C Police and shares information with C.I. Pezzani.   Louisa.Daley@swdevon.gov.uk

 

Cllr. Peter Smerdon

SHDC Member for South Brent   01364 642207 Cllr.Smerdon@southhams.gov.uk

road closure – Church Cross to Memory Cross – 18 Jul

 THE COUNTY OF DEVON (TEMPORARY RESTRICTION) (CHURCH CROSS TO MEMORY CROSS, STAVERTON) NOTICE 2018 

TEMPORARY PROHIBITION OF THROUGH TRAFFIC & PARKING 

DEVON COUNTY COUNCIL hereby give NOTICE that: 

From WEDNESDAY 18 JULY 2018 

for a maximum of 5 days 

Until THURSDAY 19 JULY 2018 (both dates inclusive) 

Between the hours of 08:00 and 16:00 

No person shall cause or permit any vehicle to proceed or wait on the sections of Affected Roads except for access to land or premises on or adjacent to those length of roads. 

Roads affected – 

CHURCH CROSS TO MEMORY CROSS, STAVERTON , JUNCTION WITH PENNYWELL CLOSE TO ENTRANCE TO BEARA FARM 

The alternative, signed, route for vehicles will be via – MEMORY CROSS, HILLCROFT TO WASH CROSS PAST BARKINGTON MANOR, CHURCH CROSS, AND VICE VERSA. 

This temporary restriction is considered necessary to enable – 

RESURFACING AND ASSOCIATED WORKS 

For additional information contact: 

E AND JW GLENDINNING LIMITED 

Telephone: 01392 465348 

Message from Fire Brigade on water awareness and risks in hot weather

                                                                                                                          29 June 2018

Be Water Aware

With the warm weather that we are experiencing Devon & Somerset Fire & Rescue Service are advising everyone to Be Water Aware.  Drowning is one of the leading causes of death amongst young people.  The quarries, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and canals may seem like a nice place to cool off, but there are many hidden dangers.  We have already sadly seen a number of incidents across the country of fatalities in Water.

Disused quarries are among the most dangerous places to bathe often containing very cold, contaminated water, old machinery and all manner of other sub-surface debris.  However Rivers, lakes, canals and reservoirs have many hidden dangers.

It is impossible to judge water depth and levels and depths may change considerably. Jumping, tombstoning or swimming in these kinds of locations have led to severe injuries and deaths every year, usually involving young people. Please take a moment to talk to your children about the dangers involved and urge them not to play in these locations.  If you are planning a trip to the coast we would also urge you to make use of the many lifeguarded beaches.

Cold Water Shock

Many people are unaware of the dangers associated with Cold Water and the phrase Cold Water Shock.  Sadly every year many people lose their life through the body’s reaction to being suddenly immersed in cold water.  Cold water shock affects our ability to swim and self-rescue.

Signs of Cold Water Shock

  1. Initial immersion responses – Cold shock response (0–3mins) immediately after immersion in cold water, rapid cooling of the skin causes a number of instinctive and reactions including gasping, hyperventilation, restriction of blood flows, and panic.
  2. Short term responses – Loss of performance (3–30mins) following the cold shock response, the hands, feet, arms and legs start to cool and blood flow continues to be restricted. This causes a decrease in muscle strength and endurance leading to muscle fatigue and reduced control over body movements. If the casualty is unable to get out of the water or use a buoyancy aid, this will ultimately result in drowning.
  3. Long term responses – Hypothermia (30mins+) over time, significant heat lost causes the core body temperature to drop leading to hypothermia.

What to do if someone falls or gets into trouble in the water

  • Firstly call for help, dial 999 and ask for the coastguard if you are at the coast, fire service and ambulance if you are inland.

 

  • Try and give an accurate location use landmarks or signs and stay on the line.

 

  • Do not enter the water. It is human nature to want to help but often will only result in two casualties in the water and nobody to direct rescuers to the scene.

 

  • Shout to them, try and get them to swim towards you, use simple language and commands e.g. swim to me.
  • Look for lifesaving equipment to throw (life rings, throw ropes) or something to reach out to them like tree branches or clothing, making sure you keep a low centre of gravity so you don’t get pulled in. Just throwing them some flotation might be enough to keep their head above water, anything, even a football or empty container would help.

You may have seen the recent campaign from the RNLI urging people to Float to live, if you or a friend enter the water or you see someone in trouble in the water follow the simple message below

 

Roadwords 2 Jul Parkfield Cross to Thornecroft Cross – up to 5 days

 SECTION 14 

THE COUNTY OF DEVON (TEMPORARY RESTRICTION) (PARKFIELD CROSS TO THORNECROFT CROSS, ASHBURTON) (NO. 5) NOTICE 2018 

TEMPORARY PROHIBITION OF THROUGH TRAFFIC & PARKING 

DEVON COUNTY COUNCIL hereby give NOTICE that: 

From MONDAY 2 JULY 2018 

for a maximum of 5 days 

Until FRIDAY 6 JULY 2018 (both dates inclusive) 

No person shall cause or permit any vehicle to proceed or wait on the sections of Affected Roads except for access to land or premises on or adjacent to those length of roads. 

Roads affected – 

PARKFIELD CROSS TO THORNECROFT CROSS, ASHBURTON 

The alternative, signed, route for vehicles will be via – NEILGATE CORNER, WELL FARM, WOODLAND FARM, MOUNT PLEASANT COTTAGE, PARKFIELD, GULLAFORD, WOOLSTON GREEN, MEMORY CROSS, CHURCH CROSS, AND VICE VERSA 

This temporary restriction is considered necessary to enable – 

DEVON HIGHWAYS – SUMMER PATCHING – FOR SURFACE DRESSING 2019/20 

For additional information contact: 

SKANSKA 

Telephone: 0330 105 2663 

 

Village Emergency Telephone System

Hidden in the report from last month’s Staverton Parish council meeting was an explanation of the role of a VETS system in the community.

VETS stands for VillageEmergency Telephone System and is a back up to the installation of the defibrillators in both village centres and can be invaluable in any emergency situation.

Sadly, when a crisis occurs there is often only one other person present when catastrophe strikes. It is impossible for that person to do more than call for help – phoning 999 and then helping the victim. If the defibrillator is needed then someone else has to fetch it and precious time can be lost trying to find someone to do that vital task.

The VETS system requires a list of eight to ten volunteers who are happy for their phone numbers to be put onto the system. The village (and every villager) is then given a single phone number to call in an emergency – when rung the phone will ring in each of the volunteer’s home at the same time. If the first person answering cannot do it the phones keep ringing until someone accepts the mission and then by accepting the call they then stop the phones ringing at the other volunteer’s houses.

By accepting the call the volunteer takes on the responsibility for getting the defibrillator to the home of the affected person.

There are some obvious difficulties in a large rural parish –

  • Distances may well require driving to the person’s home.
  • Keeping the VETS phone number somewhere prominent and available
  • Getting enough volunteers to make the system work
  • The system only works with landline phones
  • Cost – £90 setup and £200 a year running costs

If anyone would like further information and particularly if they would be prepared to take on the responsibility of being a “VETS” volunteer please get in touch with Michael Loverock on 01803 762677 or cllr.loverock@gmail.com